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July 06, 2011

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Taka

>>> MY problem is that I have no idea how the hell we are going to do that

Is it even possible? As you suggested, digital literacy isn't simply about being able to use the technology, it's about having a deeper understanding of how it works and how it can be used, and the ability to incorporate it into the way we operate. Past a certain age, most people simply can't change all that much, which is why these kinds of shift take time to happen - you have to wait for the old guard to (literally) die off :-)

Earl Mardle

Taka. I don't know if its possible but I'm pretty sure that things are changing too fast to leave the (sometime) dead hands on the tillers.

Its one of my well used lines that we can't just wait for all these people to die off. We are, after all, talking about the boomers who now hold too much power at just the moment when their (our) time has gone.

In part I want us to be smart enough to get it and at least get out of the way because I really don't want to be caught in some great sweeping out of the boomer stables.

Taka

>>> I'm pretty sure that things are changing too fast to leave the (sometime) dead hands on the tillers.

The rate of change is accelerating - it'll be interesting when it becomes too fast for anyone to keep up :-)

>>> We are, after all, talking about the boomers who now hold too much power at just the moment when their (our) time has gone.

Yah, but it's always the case that the oldies cling to power after their time has passed. Most of your examples demonstrate the little people using their understanding of technology to prevail over those in power. Boomers might hold the titles and positions of power but their lack of understanding will doom them to irrelevance and impotence. The danger we face now is the reach of their influence - once upon a time, problems were localised but now, stuff-ups are bigger and affect every part of the globe.

>>> In part I want us to be smart enough to get it and at least get out of the way because I really don't want to be caught in some great sweeping out of the boomer stables.

IIRC, I was always much more pessimistic than you, especially when it comes to expectations of people. Anyone hoping for us to be smart enough to do anything more than get out of bed in the morning is undoubtably going to be disappointed :-/ Me, I'm just trying to carve out a little space somewhere for myself, out of the path of the imminent Great Sweeping :-)

Earl Mardle

You and me both carving a little place mate. I never saw you as a pessimist; anyone prepared to take the kinds of risks you get into, (Sax - with an A - in Bangkok for example) launching Awasu etc, looks like an optimist to me.

But we agree on expectations of smarts in general. And the further up the tree we go, the fewer smarts we find. OK, back to the garden.

Floydwilde

The scary thing that occurs to me considering the digital literacy of Narces Benoit vs. the Miami Beach cops, is that if the cop had been digitally literate, he would have simply checked the phone for the sd card, and may have frisked it off Narces had he been smart enough. In which case Narces may have had the smarts to switch the cards out with another, we would hope. (note to self: always carry extra sd card in case of witnessing policy brutality)

Anyway, my feeling is that we can do something about improving digital literacy. There is not silver bullet solution, no more than there is for any other social problem.

Part of the solution in my mind, is having community technology centres and supporting these spaces with other resources. So I am starting to work on mapping community technology resources in New Zealand. I'm working on this here:

http://wiki.digilit.org.nz

Would appreciate any feedback.

Rob Lindstrom

As I think Earl you said in an earlier post, there is no one in control of the digital revolution (that term is starting to sound so quaint) and that seems to me the whole point about what to do or not do about digital illiteracy.

In the Digital Age control is an illusion, a remnant of earlier times. (Actually, it was always an illusion, but it used to seem much more real.)

In place of control we have influence, which is real and is growing and broadening exponentially. The thing about influence is you cannot wield it to achieve preconceived ends. It's dynamic, variable and ongoing.

In this reality it matters greatly whether you are optimistic or pessimistic, hopeful or cynical, because when it comes to influence, attitude is everything. What you feel is what you get.

Earl, I enjoyed the video clip. We obviously share perspectives. My take on your NetHui rant is posted at http://www.literacy20.com

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